House District 23 |

Ryan Sedgeley, Democrat

Q: What qualities, training, experiences, and skills would you bring to this office?

A: I have a JD, which equips me with the skills to understand and write laws with knowledge of how courts will interpret those laws and agencies will implement them. My master’s degree in environment and natural resources focused on collaboration, which is essential within a legislature. I also spent a significant amount of time reading and studying history and political theory. In addition to my education, I have extensive work experience including blue collar work, work for the federal government, and farm work. I can see the issues from many different angles and how a proposed law would impact those various groups of people. I bring empathy, compassion, a willingness to listen and then advocate and work with others.

People are also reading…

Q: What, if anything, would you support to improve reasonable access to health care in Wyoming?

A: Expanding Medicaid is the easiest thing Wyoming could do to immediately help so many people in our state. It would also help keep our hospitals and doctors running, particularly in our rural areas. I support the expansion of Medicaid and a universal health care system. I also support the expansion of telemedicine. Where I live, seeing a doctor is a full day trip, so being able to see a doctor via video or phone would help us rural people. This is equally true for mental health providers. Telemedicine gives Wyoming residents a larger pool of providers to choose from. Mail order prescriptions are also important to make this system work for rural people. I would support making any of these things easier to access.

Q: What specific measures, if any, would you propose to generate state revenue in the future?

A: I would work to encourage our federal delegation to establish several new national parks and monuments in areas that would encourage tourism and recreation. I’m proposing we pass an anti-discrimination bill so employers really want to move here. As long as we are a “hate state”, companies will avoid us. I support investing as much as we can in high speed internet to stay competitive. I support legalizing and taxing marijuana and raising taxes on alcohol and cigarettes. Finally, he would propose a set of new taxes. A progressive income tax, a wealth tax, a tax on second homes. It would cut fossil fuel subsidies and eliminate the legal structures people use to stash money in Wyoming.

Q: The current funding of the school is adequate.

Q: Explain your answer about school funding.

A: We need more funding to provide free preschool, healthy meals for children, and free community college and UW tuition for Wyoming residents.

Liz Storer, Democrat

Q: What qualities, training, experiences, and skills would you bring to this office?

A: I first set foot in the Wyoming State Capitol in Cheyenne in 1994 advocating for wildlife and water and have since been involved in state politics, serving on various bipartisan state task forces as well as the Ruckelshaus Institute at UW. I have lived in Wyoming for 30 of the last 35 years and in Jackson since 2008. As Executive Director of the Storer Foundation for the last 14 years, I led an effort to increase our impact. I will continue to find solutions that conserve the state’s unique landscapes and wildlife, promote economic diversification, develop sustainable communities, and foster an engaged citizenry, recognizing that many of the state’s challenges and Teton County’s problems are rooted in politics state tax and decreased revenue.

Q: What, if anything, would you support to improve reasonable access to health care in Wyoming?

A: Studies report notable improvements in the 38 states with expanded Medicaid coverage, including improved access to health care, improved health outcomes, beneficial economic impacts on state budgets, hospitals and other health care providers, and improvements in stability individual economic and access to care in rural areas. The expansion of Medicaid in Wyoming will improve access, improve overall health outcomes, and reduce costs for our medical providers and patients. If you don’t, you will continue to reduce access and increase costs.

Wyoming could also emphasize preventive care, include health education in its school curricula, and support populations that want to create healthier environments to address many of their health care challenges.

Q: What specific measures, if any, would you propose to generate state revenue in the future?

A: Wyoming’s outdated tax policy is narrowly based (depending on declining fossil fuel extraction), unsustainable (most Wyoming people generate only a fraction of the taxes needed to cover the services they use), and not it is equitable (low- and middle-income families pay a higher percentage of their income in taxes than wealthy families). Wyoming needs fiscal policy that is comprehensive, sustainable, and equitable; Given Wyoming’s current low-tax environment, there are many options to consider to achieve those goals. Modernizing Wyoming’s approach to managing its $24 billion corpus should be a priority given its significantly lower return on investment than its peers. This could result in a significant increase in revenue while keeping taxes low for everyone.

Q: The current funding of the school is adequate.

Q: Explain your answer about school funding.

A: As noted above, Wyoming’s tax revenues are unsustainable and have already led to cuts in education funding. Only due to the infusion of federal funds related to the pandemic, the state is able to continue funding education near historical levels. The state is also one of four states that does not have a state-funded early childhood education program, despite evidence that investing in early childhood education creates long-term benefits for society and saves the state money in the long run. Funding high-quality ECE should be a priority for the state, giving Wyoming’s youngest citizens a head start and supporting young families struggling to make ends meet while paying high child care costs.

Paul Vogelheim, Republican

Q: What qualities, training, experiences, and skills would you bring to this office?

A: Vogelheim served more than a decade on the Teton County Board of Commissioners, including as chairman. He currently serves on the boards of the Community Foundation Jackson Hole (Executive Committee); One-22: Jackson Pantry and Resource Center; San Juan Health Foundation; the Center for the Secret of Peace (Rwanda); ConservAmerica and the Friends of Jackson Hole Scouting. He is a graduate of Gonzaga University (ZAGS) and has held a variety of senior management positions in the private sector for over 25 years, including Director of Exclusive Services for OTR Global, General Manager of the largest window manufacturing plant Of California. and as a start-up manager for an Australian steel decking manufacturer in Alaska.

Q: What, if anything, would you support to improve reasonable access to health care in Wyoming?

A: Access to Behavioral Health Care: Identify opportunities to improve prevention resources and access to care, including sponsorships to navigate insurance payments and finding additional state funding opportunities.

Q: What specific measures, if any, would you propose to generate state revenue in the future?

Q: The current funding of the school is adequate.

A: Neither agree nor disagree.

Q: Explain your answer about school funding.

A: Concerned about the dramatic loss of key teachers due to our high cost of living in Teton County.

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published.