Sorbet: not only a Ramadan classic, but also refreshing throughout the year

I guess we all have some pretty complicated problems keeping warm when it’s cold and cooling down when it’s hot. Yes, and our problem right now is to cool off. There is a phrase that roughly means, “like jumping from hot sand into cold water,” used to express satisfaction in cooling off, and we all need to jump into cold waters today with how hot it is all over the world. So, today I want to talk about a cold drink that will give you the opportunity to use this expression, or should we say, drinks.

I love making drinks, trying different recipes and creating new ones. In developed countries, similar businesses in the consumption of food and beverages, usually franchised, sometimes start to get boring.

So, sherbet came to my mind when I was looking for a healthy and unique drink that we can consume in hot weather.

Today, I would like to share different recipes that are actually old, but can be considered new as they have been mostly forgotten.

However, let’s talk about the sherbet itself first. What is sherbet?

Selling sherbet on the streets is a tradition that has survived in Turkey since the time of the Ottoman Empire.  (Photo by Shutterstock)
Selling sherbet on the streets is a tradition that has survived in Turkey since the time of the Ottoman Empire. (Photo by Shutterstock)

classic ramadan

Although sherbet is a commonly consumed beverage during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, there is always a reason to drink sherbet.

Sherbet is believed to have originated in Iran. The term itself means a drink of sugar and water in Persian.

The word entered Italian as “sorbetto” and became “sorbet” in French.

Today, this drink is still popular in Iran, but it was an iconic part of the culture of the Ottoman Empire.

The Turks are a nation that lived its most glorious period during the Ottoman Empire, and thanks to its geography and deep-rooted history, they have a very rich culinary culture.

The fact that alcohol was not part of the Ottoman culinary culture due to the influence of Islam ensured the formation of a rich culture of sherbets and compotes that gained a special place in both the palace and public kitchens.

During the Ottoman Empire, a special section for desserts was created in the Imperial Palace, and they were entrusted with the preparation of many types of desserts such as halva, jam, pasta, compote, sherbet. The difference between compote and sorbet is that the compote is served with fruit grains.

There were numerous street vendors selling sherbet on the streets during the Empire, and they can still be seen occasionally in Turkey today.

Apart from the palace and the street places, sherbet had many places in the tradition.

Traditionally, something called Postpartum Sherbet was offered to a woman who had just given birth and to those who came to visit her. Various sherbets were consumed at weddings, during Ramadan and at parties.

Fruits, flowers, tree leaves and bark, plant roots, and spices were used to make sherbet. Their method of preparation varies between them.

Some of the syrups are used to relieve heat and aid digestion, and others are used as medicine for illnesses.

As I write, I realize that it is a very long and detailed topic, so let’s end the story here and share some sherbet recipes, you can try them with different fruits or spices according to your taste.

Remember this piece when you’re drinking a healthy beverage that will keep its flavor on your palate and cool you down at the same time in hot weather.

The basic sherbet itself is produced by simply squeezing fruit juice and adding sugar, or by boiling fruit, flowers, or herbs together with sugar, or by infusing leaves or flowers with hot water, or by diluting the syrup obtained by boiling fruit, with sugar. for a long time with water.

Licorice sorbet is known to strengthen the immune system with its antioxidant effect.  (Photo by Shutterstock)
Licorice sorbet is known to strengthen the immune system with its antioxidant effect. (Photo by Shutterstock)

licorice sorbet

10 grams of licorice root are cleaned and washed, cut into 20-centimeter pieces and crushed with a mallet. It is kneaded as dough by sprinkling a little water on it, and this process is repeated several times as it absorbs its water.

Yeast is formed by adding a little more water to the roots, and liquorice syrup is made by adding a little water to the yeast.

So that the syrup is not bitter, it is foamed by pouring it from one container to another, and then skimming off the foam.

At the time of serving, add 10 grams of licorice root, cinnamon sticks and cloves to a bowl with two liters of water and leave it in a cold environment for 8 to 10 hours. The chilled syrup is filtered and then served.

Licorice root sorbet strengthens the immune system with its antioxidant effect.

rose sorbet

After washing 1 glass of rose petal tea, it is brought to a large container and 1 glass of boiling water is poured over it. The container is tightly closed and left for a day. Then the syrup, obtained by mixing and then boiling water and sugar, is added and cooled.

The rose syrup thus obtained is mixed with water and served.

Rose sorbet is an Ottoman sherbet made without cooking.

Tamarind fruit is believed to have many health benefits.  (Photo by Shutterstock)
Tamarind fruit is believed to have many health benefits. (Photo by Shutterstock)

Tamarind Sorbet

500 grams of tamarind are kept in 8 glasses of water from evening to morning. It is then boiled and filtered. Sugar is added to it and cooled after mixing. Ice cream is served.

Tamarind, believed to have many health benefits, is a tough-skinned fruit, also known as an Indian date.

pomegranate sorbet

Pomegranates are sorted and filled into a bowl and crushed well. A little water is added and then filtered and added to the filtered water and boiled.

It is then served cold.

Pomegranate sorbet is known to balance blood sugar level and blood pressure.

Pomegranate sorbet is known to balance blood sugar level and blood pressure.  (Photo by Shutterstock)
Pomegranate sorbet is known to balance blood sugar level and blood pressure. (Photo by Shutterstock)

Reyhan sorbet

Wash a bunch of basil and put it in a bowl. Then add 6 glasses of hot water, 6 tablespoons of granulated sugar and the juice of half a lemon – or salt from 4 to 5 lemons. Mix until the sugar dissolves and then cover. It is served after cooling.

Reyhan Sherbet has a regulating effect on metabolism.

Koruk Sorbet

Koruk is the name given to unripe grapes with a tart, sour taste. Although it has several uses, it is mainly consumed by extracting its water.

One kilogram of cornstarch grains are crushed in a mortar and filtered, and the water is removed by squeezing hard by hand. The water that comes out is filtered through a fine mesh strainer. Wait a while for the pulp to settle to the bottom and filter it again so that part of the pulp stays at the bottom and separates. 2 cups of granulated sugar are boiled with 2 liters of water. Koruk juice is added.

It is served cold. You can adjust the proportion of sugar according to your taste.

This sorbet helps eliminate harmful toxins accumulated in the body.

Koruk, or unripe grapes with a tart, sour taste, help to remove harmful toxins accumulated in the body.  (Photo by Shutterstock)
Sherbet is a commonly consumed drink during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, although there is always a reason to drink sherbet.

ramadan sherbet

Boil 1 glass of morello cherry, 1 glass of granulated sugar, 2 cinnamon sticks and 2 to 3 cloves in 1 liter of water. It is served cold after filtering.

Finally, among all these classic recipes, I would like to share with you two recipes that I have created.

Red fruit sorbet

Cook 1 cup of granulated sugar and 1 liter of water until sugar dissolves and cool. Grate the zest of 1 lemon, squeeze the juice and mix it with a handful of mint leaves. Mash a handful of strawberries, raspberries and blackcurrants with a mallet or put them in a blender. Then mix all the ingredients in a large bowl adding another liter of water. Filter and serve with ice.

Cherry and ginger sorbet

Boil 200 grams of cherries with the peel of a chopped lemon, a piece of fresh ginger and 1.5 cups of granulated sugar in 2 liters of water for 20 minutes. Serve cold with plenty of ice.

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